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Prep Your Home For Winter With These Tips

As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization. Winterizing a house means preparing the inside and outside of your home for use in cold weather.

 

There are multiple parts to winterizing a home, the goal is to keep your house warm, safe and efficient during the coldest time of the year. Winterizing your home does take some time, so make sure to start before the snow fall.

 

How to winterize a house:

  1. Weatherstrip your windows.
  2. Check all your windows and doors for leaks, find where cold air sneaks in and add weatherstrips. Here’s how to weather strip a door and here’s how to weatherstrip a window. If you already have weatherstripped frames, you should still check for drafts and replace weatherstripping if necessary.

    As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization.

  3. Change screens to storm doors and windows.
  4. Replace all screen doors with storm doors and, similarly, change screen windows to storm windows. Storm doors and windows do a much better job of keeping the warm air in, plus they stop harsh winds and cold air from getting into your home. Here’s a complete guide to storm windows.

  5. Caulk around windows and doors.
  6. Check for drafts around windows and doors. Caulk around the window and door frames inside and out to keep heat from escaping. Here’s how to use caulk and keep your home efficient.

    As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization.

  7. Replace your air filter.
  8. Clean or replace the air filter in your furnace for maximum efficiency and improved indoor air quality. Read this article on your indoor air quality and how often you should change your air filter.

    As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization.

  9. Check smoke alarms.
  10. Check that your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors are in working order, if not, replace batteries. According to the U.S. Fire Administration, cooking is the lead cause of winter house fires so it’s important to make sure your smoke alarms are good for the whole season.

    As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization

  11. Clean  your gutters.
  12. Cleaning your gutters of leaves and debris will allow water to run through to your troughs evenly. If your gutters are full, snow and ice melt can overflow, creating icicles and weighing your gutters down. If you have extra weight in your gutters there’s a possibility they could detach and need reinstallation.

    As temperatures start to drop and frost visits your home every morning, it’s time to start thinking about winterization

     

  13. Get your air ducts cleaned.

Furnace cleaning is invaluable to the way your home breathes and performs. The NADCA recommends you should clean your air ducts every 5-8 years. Depending on the situation of your home, that number can change. Visit our FAQ page for answers how often you should clean your air ducts depending on your circumstances.